Get Wisdom—Get Understanding!

Get Wisdom—Get Understanding!

People recognize the value of pursuing wisdom. Some propagate the benefit of receiving a degree from a college, university, or seminary. Others prefer obtaining a specialized certification from a trade school. Some refer to themselves as self-taught, spending countless hours poring over information designed to help them hone their craft or interest.

However, without being accompanied by understanding, wisdom itself is minimized. Solomon understood this. Proverbs 4:7, “Wisdom is the principal thing; therefore get wisdom: and with all thy getting get understanding.”

I cannot stress the value of being able to understand. In relationships, people often struggle to understand themselves, their spouse, children, co-workers, preacher, etc.

The word “understand,” is a derivative of a root word meaning “to discern,” referring to the proper application of knowledge.

On the surface, you may know yourself, your spouse, or your children reasonably well. However, during a conflict, the impulsive reaction, many times, is lacking in understanding. Generally, the initial response is one of defensive posturing.

Wisdom is static and is present at the onset of any situation. But understanding requires taking time. The implementation of patience is the furthest thing from many minds in the heat of the moment. And yet, it is accessing patience that allows us to maintain or protect our soul (Luke 21:19).

How to increase understanding.

How can we increase our understanding? Good question!

A significant way to increase our understanding is by actively listening. Rather than listen, many humans tend to formulate what they will say while the other person is talking. It’s hard to hear when you are not listening.

Another way to increase understanding is to reflect deeply on what just happened. There are a few instances that demand immediate attention. However, most situations allow us to take some time and consider not just our perspective but also the other persons.

Understanding can be a gift from God, as in Daniel’s case. But it can also be sought for and learned.

You want to understand yourself better? Or, your spouse? I can help you do that. Contact me at dsirstad@dsministries.com.

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