I Just Assumed …

How many times have you said or thought these words, “I just assumed …?” How many times have you heard these words, “I just assumed …?”

Every time we assume, we open the possibility of conflict, stress, anxiety, etc. Not only are we impacted by these negative emotions, but the subject or subjects of our assumptions are affected as well.

I have been guilty of assuming that if my good wife likes a certain type of food today, she will like that type of food tomorrow, or next week, or next month. However, experience has taught me not to assume this. I have learned that some days, she likes certain foods but on other days, although she still likes that food, she is not in the mood for it.

Assuming that people are the same yesterday, today and will remain so forever is a poor assumption. It is doubtful any of us would vocalize this. However, our actions belay that underlying assumption.

Dictionary.com defines assume as “to take for granted or without proof: to assume that everyone wants peace.”

Communication can be a great asset when it comes to rectifying the assumption process.

It is not the best choice to believe something without proof. To base a belief on an assumption is dangerous. If you were to take for granted that I like onions on anything just because you or the majority of the world may would be an assumption without any basis of proof. Although this example would not be outwardly dangerous to you, the danger would be in you being offended at the pile of onions left on my plate after you went out of your way to prepare a fine meal with great plate presentation.

The way to bypass any offense in this example would be for you to validate my feelings towards onions in advance of your culinary efforts.

So many times, we base our attitude towards people based on what has been passed on to us by others. We assume what we hear is truth. Rather than believe everything at face value, we do ourselves a great service when we validate what we hear.

Assuming everything is okay with the relationships in your life could be a mistake. Use some quality control questions from time to time. Don’t take for granted because last year was okay that today is okay too. Validate the relationship is okay today. Look for proof.

Assuming your relationship with God is okay is opening to door to developing a state of being lukewarm. Do not take your relationship with God for granted. Rather, provide positive proof on a daily basis.

Assuming your God will automatically become your children’s God could be devastating. Take time with each of your children developing their own relationship with God. Don’t assume others will do this. Do your part.

People with indirect behavior do a lot of assuming. Determine if you assume things in life. If you catch yourself saying “I just assumed …” work to cease and desist. Ask questions. Let people give their input. Trust and verify.

By this time, I would assume you get the idea.

Now, help me prove it. Let me know your thoughts.

Leave a Comment





Archives

You might also like these articles...

Responding to False Accusations

Responding to False Accusations Have you ever been accused incorrectly? Of course, you have. It started early on in life when your parents accused you of making a mess. In reality, it was your sibling, a neighborhood friend, or the family pet. But you were accused, and you had to clean it up. Do you…

Read More about Responding to False Accusations

Pushing Buttons, Stirring Pots & Poking Bears

Pushing buttons, stirring the pot, poking the bear, etc. are all terms used to get someone worked up to the point where a reaction takes place. Usually the reaction caused is not a positive one. I was working with a couple and at some point, in the process, received a request from the husband. His…

Read More about Pushing Buttons, Stirring Pots & Poking Bears

Forgiveness & Trust

Forgiveness & Trust Is it necessary to trust again after forgiveness has been given? We know that forgiveness of others is necessary so we may maintain forgiveness in our own lives, but does that mean we have to trust the one we have forgiven again?  Several years ago, I asked an older minister this question.…

Read More about Forgiveness & Trust